Terrarium Tutorial Time!

I LOVE plants. Adore them. Very much an obsession of mine (I think I’ve made my point). Have you seen my instagram? It’s literally all I talk about and I’m pretty sure no one cares. Whatevs. So that brings me to…

…Terrariums, as they’ve become popular over the years, are great ways to bring green into your place. I especially like having plants in my apartment because I live in LA, and the only outdoor area attached to my apartment is a little balcony. And trust me, every inch of it is already filled with plants.

Succulents, as well as mosses and ferns, make great plants for your terrarium. As much as I love succulents, I REALLY like mosses and ferns, so that’s what I’ll be doing today.  This is my way of bringing aspects of the Pacific Northwest to my LA apartment. Feeble attempt, but what’s a girl gotta do?

So for this terrarium, I decided to go with a closed container, which creates the humid environment that is ideal for mosses and ferns.  An open container (so, one without the lid in case that wasn’t obvious) is ideal for succulents that prefer drier environments.

photo

I forbid you for judging me for using instagram for these pictures. The coolest thing about my camera is that is attached to my phone…sooo- sorry blogosphere, for not having a Canon 239439848 NADFSDF or a Nikon 454935455 WFDSx (I’m such a newb, I can’t even properly BS this subject…)

So this is what we’ll need:

  • Gravel/pebbles
  • Soil
    • Make sure it doesn’t have fertilizer (or at least not a lot). You don’t want your plants to outgrow their container!
  • Activated charcoal/carbon– you can find this anywhere that they sell fish/fish supplies (not the kind you eat…)!
    • Why activated charcoal? The charcoal helps lessen the chance of buildup of microorganisms (such as algae) and helps clean the air in the terrarium for your plant to breathe. It provides a minimal amount of carbon for your plant, because plants need CO2 (flashback to biology class). Activated charchoal is particularly necessary for closed containers.
  • A glass container
  • Moss
    • You can find this at Home Depot/Lowes. I actually got a mixed bag of all different mosses from JoAnn crafts.
  • Plants, such as ferns
    • I found mine at Home depot, and mine is a maidenhair fern, which cost about $3. Ferns & mosses do really well in highly humid environments and they grow pretty slowly. You could also do succulents. I wouldn’t choose fast growing succulents (such as Jade), but focus on small ornamental succulents that you can find at Home Depot, Lowes, Wal-Mart, etc…

Here’s the activated charcoal/carbon I bought from Petco. It’s $7 and more than enough.

IMG_1990

TADA!!!

Terrarium

Care for your terrarium:

For your closed terrarium, you rarely need to water it! Like… once a month. For a succulent terrarium (that’s open), like… once a week.

That’s a relatively large container as far as terrariums go, but I wanted something that was tall enough for the Maidenhair fern that I’m using.  This container is also made of 100% recycled glass. Glass is quite possibly one of my favorite materials for DIY projects.  It’s pretty, long-lasting and cheap. Loves it!

Did you know…?

  • Glass is infinitely recyclable. It doesn’t lose its quality over time, which is what makes it so environmentally friendly! HOW COOL!!! 
  • Glass if made of quartz sand, soda ash and limestone. It is made naturally in the environment by things like lightning & volcanoes.
  • The turnover time of recycling glass & having it out in stores can be as little as a month! That’s awesome and very efficient.
  • A glass bottle that is sent to a landfill can take up to a million years to break down. Recycle that sh*t!
  • For every ton of glass recycled, 1,300 pounds of sand, 410 pounds of soda ash, 380 pounds of limestone, and 160 pounds of feldspar are saved.
  • Recycling glass produces NO by-products because glass recycling is a closed-loop system. This means that it creates no waste, which is definitely environmentally friendly.
  • Glass has a longer shelf life than any other packaging material. Beat that, plastic.

Side note: When I was picking out this glass container, I clumsily dropped on the floor, like an idiot. It literally BOUNCED on the wood floor, and didn’t break or even crack! I figured that buying this jar was fate, a fool-proof choice and perfect for my idiocy.

Wasn’t that FUN? I’ll keep you all updated, unless of course, my whole terrarium rots and in THAT case… jk it better not.

It’s so easy, you’ve gotta try it. It’s seriously fool-proof. Send me pictures of your final project!

-Daria

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3 thoughts on “Terrarium Tutorial Time!

  1. Nilou Sarraf says:

    Thank you, I can’t wait to start!

  2. […] out my other terrarium tutorial for more info about how to assemble it. But seriously, it’s so freaking easy, I trust that you […]

  3. […] you haven’t read my longggg ordeal about how cool and recyclable glass is on my Terrarium Tutorial Time post, I’ll briefly mention it here.  Basically, glass is infinitely recyclable and a great […]

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